Common Jiu-Jitsu Injuries and How to Avoid Them

Posted by admin

Aug 1, 2013 4:55:00 PM

Wrapping fingers to avoid BJJ injuries

Like most full-contact sports, there's always a risk of injury while competing or practicing Jiu-Jitsu. Anytime you roll with a competitor in the gym, you run the risk of injuring yourself. Thankfully, there are several different precautionary measures competitors can take to reduce their chance of injury. For a closer look into common Jiu-Jitsu injuries and how to avoid them, keep reading.

If you've been practicing Jiu-Jitsu for any length of time, you've probably witnessed someone suffer from a sprained knee. It's a pretty common condition that occurs in Jiu-Jitsu and many other styles of combat training. While sprained knees typically heal on their own, they can still be quite uncomfortable. So, how are you supposed to prevent sprained knees during Jiu-Jitsu practices? You can reduce your chance by building up your hamstring and calf muscles. The more muscle fibers you have here, the better the support is around your knee. Focus on these muscles when you hit the weight room to better protect yourself against a sprained knee. And if you do happen to develop a sprained knee, keep it iced down and supplement it with a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) like aspirin to help reduce the swelling.

Arguably, the single most common types of injury in Jiu-Jitsu are bruises. After a good day of training, you may wake up the next morning only to discover huge blackish-blue marks on your body. Unfortunately, there's really not much you can do to protect yourself against bruises. Keep putting yourself out there and don't be afraid to develop some bruises on your body. After all, it's a sign that you've been training!

A more serious type of injury that's fairly common in Jiu-Jitsu are torn ligaments. As you can expect, tearing a ligament in your knee is a serious injury that will force you to stop practicing Jiu-Jitsu until you fully recover. Practicing with a torn ligament is careless and may result in permanent damage, which is why it's important to receive plenty of rest until you've fully recovered. Going back to the importance of working out your hamstrings and calf muscles, these leg muscles will also help to keep you protected against torn ligaments. Also, don't be afraid to tap out when you are in an uncomfortable position. If you feel unusual pressure or force against your knees, don't fight it but instead tap out. Doing so could potentially save you from injury.

You might be surprised to learn just how common minor cuts and lacerations are in Jiu-Jitsu. There are certainly no knives or blades on the mats, so how do cuts such as these occur? From a competitor accidentally hitting their opponent to accidentally scratching them with a fingernail or toenail, there are dozens of different ways lacerations may occur. Instead of trying to prevent lacerations and cuts from occurring, though, you should work to keep them properly wrapped up once they happen.

Topics: Training Hints and Tips

New Call-to-action
New Call-to-action
New Call-to-action
New Call-to-action
New Call-to-action
New Call-to-action