The Importance of the Instructional DVD

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Dec 11, 2014 10:30:00 AM

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The Importance of the Instructional DVD

 

Whether it’s snip its off YouTube, buying DVDs or reading books - all these streams of knowledge will help benefit your game. 

DVDs are the best of these three options. All the techniques are organized in a way that helps you better memorize the concepts. Usually each position has several options for you to practice. This also helps you develop a deeper understanding of the technique. In jiu-jitsu, you never want there to be a shortage of options in any position. So the more you know from every angle, the more dangerous of a practitioner you will be. 

Contrastingly, Youtube gives you a very shallow understanding of each technique usually. Most techniques are way too fancy and will not work on live opponents. That usually can just be considered a waste of time. You want to learn techniques that have the highest hit rate of working and suit your physique. DVDs are especially made to show you practical techniques that actually work. You will almost never find these kinds of techniques on Youtube. The details of these techniques are well protected by their instructors and they will only give it away for money, such as a DVD. Even then, many instructors on DVDs don’t like to go into too much detail. 

Books can be a good source of information, but in a way, it’s an outdated form of communicating concepts as visual as BJJ - videos are the way to go. So although DVDs do cost money, it’s worth it. You have to make sure you choose a DVD with an instructor that has a game that suits your own. If you love spider guard, there is no point in investing in a Bernardo Faria DVD that focuses on half-guard when you should be buying a Cobrinha DVD. If you’re a white, blue and even purple belt, I would recommend consulting with your professor to decide which instructional will help you most. Many DVDs are not all encompassing and they may focus on small specialties. 

One good way to make this decision is to think about the biggest holes in your game. Obviously none of us are perfect and we have many things to work on, but pick something that has been frustrating you the most. For example, have you been having serious trouble escaping from side mount or mount? Then perhaps you should find a DVD that specializes in escapes. Or perhaps you keep getting your partners’ back, but you’re having trouble maintaining the position or finishing your opponents – then you should find a DVD on back taking and control. 

Think about some world champions that you admire and what type of game they use in competition. As I mentioned earlier, Bernardo Faria is a deep half-guard bottom player, Cobrinha has one of the best spider guards, Marcelo Garcia has many specialties – over the years he has shown that he is a master of the x-guard, guillotines, armdrags, back control and rear naked choke. The Miyao and the Mendes Brothers have been amazing at using the Bermibolo. Caio Terra has a sophisticated fifty-fifty guard amongst some other deadly guard techniques. 

So although DVDs can cost anywhere from thrity to one-hundred dollars, it may not be a bad idea to see what they can do for you. Some say that they may not have the time to see all the techniques that are on one DVD, but that’s not true. No one is asking you to sit and study the DVD like you’re preparing for a PhD. Before every class, look at one technique and try to remember it. When you go to your academy, try it out with some friends, play around with it and make it your own. If you find it too difficult to do, or your body doesn’t work well with it, then you can always try another technique the next day. If you can really absorb two to three techniques from each DVD into your game permanently, or at least until you find something better suited for you, then they money was well spent. You can’t put a price on useful BJJ techniques.

 

 Grab a few technique ideas to drill here: Gameness Technique Videos

 

Check out Gameness Gis here

 

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Topics: Training Hints and Tips, BJJ Technique Videos

Stephen Hall’s BJJ Gi Cross-Choke from Mount

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Oct 15, 2013 5:37:00 PM

Stephen “Pesadelo” Hall has been a long time Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu competitor, coach, and tournament referee. He’s won numerous competitions the Black Belt World Championships, so when he demonstrates a technique that he has found effective, it’s always a pleasure to watch as he instructs it.

Steve is wearing his Gameness Feather gi as he teaches this cross-choke from mount, and his partner is wearing a Gameness AIR gi.

Step 1:

 

This technique begins with you in the mount position on your opponent. The key is to keep pressure on him/her without allowing your bodyweight to be controlled by your opponent’s movements. If you place too much of your weight down, as your opponent bucks, you will be susceptible to a sweep. You can do this by pinching your knees tight around his/her midsection and trying to get your feet under his/her hips to remove power.

Step 2:

 

When you get the opportunity, slide the blade of your arm under your opponent’s head. Drive your cross-face across until your opponent’s head is at an angle. This will prevent your opponent from turning into you as you attempt the choke. You then drive your body weight up and across to put more pressure against your opponent’s neck while also sliding your opposite arm as a post out away from your body.

Step 3:

 

Now move your post arm into towards your body and across your opponent’s neck to grab onto his/her far lapel. This will be the same grip as if you were attempting a basic cross-collar choke from guard. Use your arm as a lever in this position to drop your weight into your elbow to apply pressure upwards. This method works better than just curling your opponent because a stronger opponent will not be able to defend as easily.

Step 4:

 

Now reach across your opponent with your free arm and drag it closely across his/her body. Use your elbow as it passes your opponent’s chin to turn his/her head until you can grip the opposite side of your opponent’s collar. Lower your head to the mats to complete the choke.

 

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Topics: BJJ Technique Videos, Stephen Technique Videos

Stephen Hall Instructs Tournament Tips

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Oct 8, 2013 4:39:00 PM

Stephen “Pesadelo” Hall instructs a new block of tournament hints and tips for BJJ competitors. In this video, he covers how referees give points for takedowns, sweeps, and advantages. These commands may change from tournament promotion to tournament promotions, but these pointers should be common to most competitions you will encounter.

Stephen Hall is wearing his competition Gameness Feather gi in this video, and his training partner is wearing his Gameness AIR gi.

TAKEDOWNS

The key to completing the takedown is to ensure that it is a clear, deliberate action, and to maintain control when your opponent lands on the mat. In order to achieve the points for the technique, you must maintain control for a full three seconds (by the referee’s count). Once you complete these steps to finishing the move, the referee will raise his hand high in the air to signal that two points have been awarded to the grappler who achieved the takedown.

If you take down your opponent, but you cannot maintain control, you will not be awarded two points. Instead, the referee will give you an advantage. This will be signaled with him/her straightening their arm parallel to the ground.

PASSING THE GUARD

Much like the takedown, you will only be awarded points for a successful guard pass if you can hold the position after the pass for three full seconds (by the referee’s count). Once you pass your opponent’s guard, the referee will give you a three count. After the three seconds pass, he/she will raise an arm signaling that three points are awarded.

If you pass, but do not hold it for three seconds, you will be awarded an advantage point (identical to the takedown advantage) in place of the three points.

SWEEPS

A sweep is any motion that brings you from the bottom to the top which begins from any form of guard. This is significant because many technique may bring you on top from side control or mount, but they will not be awarded points because they were not from your guard. These moves are considered reversals, not sweeps.

A sweep follows the same guidelines as a guard pass/takedown in the sense that it requires you to hold the position for three seconds in order to be awarded the two points. Otherwise, you will only be awarded an advantage.

ACCEPTING THE POSITION

Lastly, Stephen Hall explains a very controversial aspect of points in Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu competition focused on accepting a position. This means that the grappler on the bottom may have points scored against him/her for a pass even though the top grappler has an arm caught in Spider. This is because the bottom grappler accepted the pass and the referee has used his/her discretion to award points for the dominant position.

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Topics: BJJ Technique Videos, Stephen Technique Videos

Stephen Hall Is Back To Teach His Favorite Sweep

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Sep 23, 2013 2:29:00 PM

The Duck-Under sweep instructed in this Free Gameness Instructional Video is the favorite of Stephen “Pesadelo” Hall, and a great way to transition from your back, to a dominant position in Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu.

Stephen is wearing his Gameness Feather gi in this video demonstration, and his partner is wearing a blue Gameness AIR gi.

Step 1: 

This technique starts in the De La Riva Guard with one foot in your opponent’s hip and the other wrapped around his/her other leg. Grip your opponent’s heal, and control his/her lapel to keep them from posturing up and attempting to pass your guard.

Step 2:

Remove your hands from your opponent’s ankle and lapel, and instead grab his/her sleeve to strip the grip. Once you’ve cleared the grip, go back to controlling your opponent’s ankle with your outside hand.

Step 3:

With both of your grips secure, kick your outside leg as high as you can, lower it to the ground to help carry your weight up and into your opponent’s leg. As your hugging around your opponent’s leg, swap the hands controlling the sleeve to your opposite hand and sit far forward.

Step 4:

With your newly freed hand, grip the cloth around your opponent’s back knee and move your head under his/her bodyweight. Continue moving under your opponent until he/she is pulled over the top of you and rolls onto his/her back.

Step 5:

Maintain your grips as you turn into your opponent. Now that you are in a secure position, pin his/her leg to the ground to avoid being brought into a half/full guard, and release the grips. Cross-face your opponent and move your arms into a good, tight side-control position to either hold for points or attack for a submission.

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Topics: BJJ Technique Videos, Stephen Technique Videos

Osvaldo Augusto Queixinho Teaches a New Armbar Variation from Guard

Posted by admin

Sep 16, 2013 3:35:00 PM

Osvaldo begins this free Gameness Instructional Video in his blue Gameness AIR gi. His opponent is wearing a white Gameness 2013 Pearl gi. Both items can be found online at www.gameness.com. The technique of the day is an armbar taught by Osvaldo from the guard. Unlike most armbars, this one can be completed with trapping your opponent’s arm with an over-hook and throwing your leg over his/her leg to force the submission.

Step 1:

Starting in the full guard, Osvaldo starts the technique by pulling his opponent’s arms off his stomach in a sweeping motion and grabbing his/her head. He overhooks the arm on the side of his opponent that he will be performing the armbar.

Step 2:

He releases his grip in the head so that his opponent can posture up, but Osvaldo keeps control of the arm. He switches his grip from an overhook to just grabbing his opponent’s elbow. To increase the level of control, Osvaldo pinches his elbow in close to his side so that his opponent will have a harder time pulling his/her arm free.

Step 3:

Osvaldo now places his foot (on the side that the arm is controlled) and uses it to push off and create an angle to his opponent. With his opposite hand, Osvaldo reaches under his opponent’s leg to further pull his body into a position and angle to attack the arm.

Step 4:

Osvaldo now swings his leg up and over his opponent’s head to a more traditional armbar position. With the targeted arm still under Osvaldo’s arm, he can create more pressure on the joint and complete the submission without having to apply as much pressure. If you are not immediately able to achieve the submission, you can begin to hip up into the joint to tap your opponent.

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Topics: BJJ Technique Videos, Osvaldo Technique Videos

Mental Strategy Tips for BJJ with Stephen “Pesadelo” Hall

Posted by admin

Sep 9, 2013 1:59:00 PM

One of the most important and often neglected aspects of Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu competition is the mental battle that takes place before or during the tournament. Black-Belt World Champion, Stephen “Pesadelo” Hall speaks on this topic in his latest free Gameness instructional video. Stephen has immense experience in competing, coaching, and refereeing BJJ tournaments, and he shares some of his tips for what works for him and what has helped him be successful in competition.

His most important tips include how and when to cut weight so that the weight loss does not affect your performance, what to do the night before the competition, and how to set your mind to the correct mode when stepping foot on the match so that you are always looking to submit your opponent.

These tips helped lead Stephen to win the Masters and Seniors IBJJF World Championships, and remain one of the most active and successful competitors in his division. He does this by matching the effort he puts forth on the physical and technical aspect of Jiu-Jitsu with his work on his mental and preparation game. As a coach, competitor, and referee, there is no better expert on tournament preparation than Stephen “Pesadelo” Hall.

 

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Topics: BJJ Technique Videos, Stephen Technique Videos

Osvaldo Augusto Quexinho Teaches a BJJ Counterattack to a Sweep

Posted by admin

Aug 27, 2013 5:19:00 PM

Osvaldo Augusto Queixinho teaches a new technique in this Gameness Free Instructional Video that can be used whenever your opponent attempts to sweep you from guard. Osvaldo is wearing his competition Gameness AIR blue gi in this video, and his training partner is wearing his white Gameness Pearl 2013 gi.

Step 1:

When in your opponent’s guard, they will attempt a sweep where they grab your collar and sleeve, and use their legs to roll you onto your back. This technique is a counterattack from this sweep, and begins as your back hits the mats. Once you hit the mat after your opponent finishes the sweep, keep your arms straight to ensure that your opponent does not manage to make it into a mount position and get on top of you. This will result in you losing the opportunity to complete this counterattack technique.

Step 2: 

From this position, bring your knee up the middle until it is between the legs of your opponent. With your outside arm, control your opponent’s other leg with an over-hook. This will prevent your opponent from both closing the space between you, and from freeing his/her leg from the hold.

Step 3:

Slide your grip down from the calf of your opponent, down to his/her ankle. With your outside foot, move it up until it is pressing against your opponent’s hip, and over their leg. As you can probably tell from here, the counterattack is going to be a straight ankle lock. Push your opponent away with the leg in his/her hip until they fall backwards. Ensure that you maintain your grip on the ankle. To complete the submission, make sure your opponent cannot come back up on top of you, roll to the outside, and straighten your back.

This submission will put pressure on your opponent’s ankle and force him/her to tap out.

 

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Topics: BJJ Technique Videos, Osvaldo Technique Videos

BJJ Black Belt, Stephen Hall, Explains Tournament Rules for Mount

Posted by admin

Aug 20, 2013 12:37:00 PM

Stephen “Pesadelo” Hall is back with Gameness again in his Feather gi instructing hints and tips for Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu competitors and fans. This video by Stephen is based in explaining the tournament rules and point values of the mount position, and how the referee will respond to achieving this position. Stephen Hall is a certified IBJJF referee, and has worked as a referee in tournaments all over North Texas. In addition to being a referee, he is also a BJJ instructor and a Masters/Seniors BJJ World Champion. While all tournament rules are different, these tips will give you some insight to how most competition promotions handle the points.

 

The first type of mount discussed is the traditional mount. This is achieved when both of
your knees are on the mat, and your opponent is flat on his/her back. While this is the most common type of mount you will see, you can also score points if one of your knees are under your opponent’s shoulder and the other is over your opponent’s other arm. It’s an unorthodox position, but it also scores you the points.

 

If your opponent or training partner turns to their side, you have the opportunity to score a “technical mount”. This mount is when one of your knees is down on the ground, and the other leg is up on your foot, above your opponent’s knees. This is also a position where you can score four points.

 

The last mount position that you can score points for is the back mount. While there are several methods of locking your opponent in, you will only receive the points if both of your hooks are in. You will not score any points for the bodylock. If you opponent tries to defend the mount by turning all the way around, and stays flat against the mat, you will also be able to score mount points by having both of your knees soundly against the ground as if in a traditional mount.

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Topics: BJJ Technique Videos, Stephen Technique Videos

Kayron Gracie Teaches a Submission Sequence ending in a Triangle Choke

Posted by admin

Aug 13, 2013 11:39:00 AM

In this latest installment of the Free Gameness Instructional Videos, Kayron Gracie continues his attack sequence from the arm bar, to the omoplata, and then finally to the triangle. This attack sequence will give you three options for attack from the guard position so that you can fall back to an alternative submission in case your opponent defends. Kayron is wearing his white Gameness XT gi in this instructional video.

Step 1: 

From a guard position, this submission begins where the earlier, omoplata video ends. This means that if you were to attempt an arm bar from guard, and then transition to an omoplata attempt, this would be your starting position for this attack.

Step 2:

If you opponent were to defend the omoplata shoulder lock and use his/her strength to posture up, you can use this to reach under your leg with your far arm, and grab a strong hold onto your opponent’s collar.

Step 3:

As your opponent postures up further, you can let him/her continue without resisting. His will bait your opponent on top of you where you can throw your leg over his/her shoulder and lock your feet.

Step 4:

From here, you pull your opponent’s trapped arm across your belly so that it is on the opposite side as it started. Once you have the arm in position, bring your opponent’s head down close to your stomach to break his/her posture.

Step 5:

With your opponent’s head held down, reach up and grab your own shin. At this point, you can break open your feet to place one foot on your opponent’s hip, create an angle, and lock a figure four with your legs.

Step 6:

To complete the submission, close your knees together as tight as you can, hip up into your opponent and pull his/her head down into your belly. This will create a triangle with your legs, and force your opponent to submit.

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Topics: BJJ Technique Videos

Caio Terra Teaches a Butterfly Guard Sweep to Mount

Posted by admin

Aug 6, 2013 10:47:00 AM

This free Gameness instructional video begins with your opponent in your butterfly guard. While the start of the technique looks much like the previous, armdrag, video, instead of taking your opponent’s back with this move, you will sweep him/her to end up in full mount.

Caio Terra is wearing his Gameness competition, Elite gi in this video, and his training partner is wearing a Limited Edition Gameness XT gi.

Step 1: 

While in butterfly guard, if trying to achieve an armdrag on your opponent, many times they will posture up and not allow you to complete the technique. If he/she postures up strongly, many times their arm will also be very difficult to control and bring down into the proper position for the armdrag. To begin the sweep from this position, switch your foot placement from a butterfly, to pushing your foot into the inside of your opponent’s knee.

Step 2:

With your foot in this position, use your opponent’s own strength in pulling back to pull yourself forward and close the distance between yourself and your opponent. When you get close to your opponent, reach your free arm around his/her back with a strong grip. While it is not mandatory to complete the technique, it will increase your control is you are able to grip your opponent’s belt at this time.

Step 3:

Pop your hips out to the side, and begin to roll to the same side that you’ve shifted. This should also be the side that you have controlled your opponent’s back or belt. When you hit the mat with your side, use the foot hooked under your opponent to flip him/her onto their back. At this point, you can transfer your weight onto your knees and sit forward to get into a secure, full-mount position and begin looking for submissions.

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Topics: BJJ Technique Videos, Caio Technique Videos

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